YOU’RE NEVER TOO OLD TO BECOME ADDICTED

More often than not, a person who is addicted to alcohol or drugs started using at an early age.

While this is true in many cases, there are plenty of other instances where a person becomes addicted to a substance later in their lifetime. With older individuals, this type of addiction usually results in a late-in-life alcoholic.

To this end, a lifestyle change, the loss of a relative, health issues, or retirement can trigger a drinking problem in a senior.

There’s also the phenomenon of living alone. Seniors who become alcoholics are often lonely and not a part of any structured social group. This, in turn, can leave a senior to his or her own devices and cause them to become what has been termed as a late onset problem drinker.

WHAT TRIGGERS A SENIOR TO BECOME A LATE ONSET DRINKER?

The word “experienced” is closely associated with seniors. It means they have been exposed to many real-world events, some of which that are life-changing.

Life-changing events occur from divorce or the death of a loved one. Children growing older and taking less interest in their elder relatives also trigger late onset drinking problems.

Life-changing events can also take place beyond familial relations, which can include retirement, loss of work-based friendships and termination.

Another issue that leads to late onset drinking can be the use of other drugs earlier in a person’s life. When the drug use is stopped, substances such as alcohol can very often replace it.

Either one, or a combination of these issues might exist as triggers that could make a senior search for relief in alcohol.

HOW DOES A LATE-IN-LIFE ALCOHOLIC FAIR IN REHAB

Seniors are said to do remarkably well in rehab.

They listen closely and carefully when they receive advice about their addiction. They are also more patient during the recovery process and less distracted.

Experts within rehabilitation industry point to seniors as the most successful group with the lowest rate of relapse of any age entered into rehab.

MY OLDER RELATIVE IS RESISTANT TO TREATMENT?

In some cases, an older adult may balk at the notion that they have a problem. That age mandates they are “too old” to become addicted to any drug, including alcohol.

The same train of thought can occur if your older relative feels ashamed of their addiction. Remember, there is no shame in addiction. The simple fact that they are seeking treatment is something to be proud of.

In cases when a senior does agree he or she has a problem, yet remains hesitant to enter rehab for financial reasons, help your senior relative by looking into their medical insurance. Double check to see if their medical insurance will or will not cover their rehabilitation.

Of course there’s always the notion of being on a fixed income, with very little money to spare even on their own health.

Reassure your older relative that affordable rehab exists in many urban and suburban portions of the nation, with counselors who specialize in multiple types of addiction suffered by various age groups.

BUT AS A SENIOR, WON’T I BE THE OLDEST PERSON IN REHAB?

Addiction knows no age. And that is how you should regard the rehabilitation process: rehabilitation is a vast endeavor which can be custom tailored for virtually anyone, regardless of age.

Don’t let age determine whether or not your drinking problem is viable enough for rehab. Take the opposite mindset and say to yourself, “The sooner I do this, the better for me.”

No matter how old you are, what your financial situation is, or why you started drinking at a late age, the time is now for you to get help.

If you or a loved one feels a need to overcome an addiction, contact BLVD Treatment Centers. At BLVD Treatment Centers we custom tailor our recovery programs within the safe and nurturing confines of our rehab treatment centers. Located throughout Southern California, in Los Angeles, Orange County, San Diego and in Portland, OR, our mission is to assess the severity of your addiction to help you achieve true recovery. Call us now at 1-866.582.9844.

The Late-in-Life Alcoholic