WHAT’S WRONG WITH BEING SINGLE AND IN RECOVERY?

Recovery from substance abuse can be difficult. Detoxing is never easy, and rehabilitation can bring an avalanche of emotions, self-realizations and other traits within yourself that you might never have been aware of, especially as you continued using.

Of course, being single doesn’t help matters – at least not initially. As a single person in recovery, you can find yourself without a friend or loved one to whom you can turn for advice, or at least reassuring hug.

Yet, some experts in the recovery industry believe that single people who go through rehab might have advantages over others who are in relationships. Keep reading to find out why being single during recovery can have its benefits.

 

YOU’RE ON YOUR OWN, WHICH IS A GOOD THING

When substance abuse is introduced into a relationship, that relationship can quite easily turn co-dependent. In other words, you validate your addiction as not that bad by the fact that you still have a wife or a girlfriend.

This can show you you’re still loved and desired, which are two valuable acknowledgements for a person to have, particularly during the humiliation of being a drug addict, and now the difficulty of breaking the habit.

However, when it comes to getting beyond your dependency, you’re on your own, which can be an empowering experience. In short, you need to be concerned with how you are progressing, and not necessarily if your relationship will live past the time and space you need to recover.

If you do find yourself preoccupied with thoughts of your significant other, concentrate even harder on your recovery with the understanding that your relationship will be even better once you do kick your addiction.

 

GET SOBER FOR YOURSELF AND NO ONE ELSE

Relationships come and go. A relationship with sobriety, however, is a union that when it does come, should never be allowed to falter.

Trust in yourself and your sobriety before attempting to rekindle an existing relationship, or starting a new one. In fact, let sobriety be your first relationship. At this point, being sober is the most important aspect of your life.

 

A PERSONAL JOURNEY

Addiction, detox and recovery are very personal journeys. Even if you know someone who has used the same drug (or drugs) as you, and have also gone through recovery, no two addictions are alike.

The road to recovery is best done by one person: you. You can’t rely on anyone else but yourself for this journey. Find out before returning to your relationship, or before you start a new one, if it is compatible with your newly discovered sobriety.

If an existing or new relationship does not mesh well with your sobriety, you should get out of the situation as soon as possible.

 

IT’S EASIER WHEN NO ONE IS AROUND

Phone calls, letters, even visits are nice to have from friends and family while in rehab (that is, if your treatment center allows visits).

Contact from a person with whom you’re in a relationship, whether new or long standing, can add pressure to your recovery.

You be the judge in this one. Ask yourself if your relationship, whether new or long term, is putting pressure on you. While people claim they understand what you’re going through as you recover that is impossible unless they also went through rehab. Only you know what you’re truly going through.

Don’t let a relationship hurry your recovery or suggest to you that you’ve had enough treatment. Remember many who end their addiction treatment early often relapse. And that can happen whether they’re single, or not.

Neither you nor your new-found sobriety should you endure this as you further your recovery.

 

WHY DO YOU THINK YOU NEED SOMEONE IN THE FIRST PLACE?

In all honesty, relationships can be both a blessing and a curse. And once booze or drugs become part of that relationship, love, devotion, honor, etc., can quickly spiral downward.

It’s imperative to honestly and objectively weigh the odds of a relationship against the importance of your sobriety.

The best outcome would be to start a new relationship devoid of drugs and alcohol. Once you get on your feet, check out one of the sober dating sites online for an idea of who’s out there looking for a relationship.

If you’re already in a relationship and newly sober, try to convince your significant other that continuing your union without alcohol or drugs is imperative to your health.

Nothing is worth jeopardizing that.

 

If you feel alcohol and/or drugs is causing a block between yourself and your loved ones, contact BLVD Treatment Centers. At BLVD Treatment Centers, we custom tailor our recovery programs within the safe and nurturing confines of our rehab treatment centers. We specialize in programs that include alcohol and drug detox and recovery, intensive outpatient rehabilitation, and specialty curriculums for members of the LGBTQ+ society. Located throughout California, in Los Angeles, Orange County, San Diego and in Portland, OR, our mission is to assess the severity of your addiction to help you achieve true recovery within 30 days. Call us now at

1-866.582.9844.

 

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Staying Single in Recovery: Why It’s a Good Idea